Irish Music

 

Sarah McLachlan and The Chieftains - "The Foggy Dew"

Music is often associated with St. Patrick's Day - and Irish culture in general.  From ancient days of the Celts, music has always been an important part of Irish life.  The Celts had an oral culture, where religion, legend and history were passed from one generation to the next by way of stories and songs.  After being conquered by the English, and forbidden to speak their own language, the Irish, like other oppressed peoples, turned to music to help them remember important events and hold on to their heritage and history.  As it often stirred emotion and helped galvanize people, music was outlawed by the English.  During her reign, Queen Elizabeth I even decreed that all artists and pipers were to be arrested and hanged on the spot.

Today, traditional Irish bands like the Chieftains, the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem are gaining worldwide popularity.  Their music is produced with instruments that have been used for centuries including the fiddle, the uilleann pipes (a sort of elaborate bagpipe) the tin whistle (a sort of flute that is actually made of nickel-silver, brass or aluminum) and the bodhran (an ancient type of framedrum that was traditionally used in warfare rather than music).

Jo-Anne Larre

Jo-Anne Larre

REALTORĀ®
CENTURY 21 Fusion
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