Water Quality

Community water systems are required to test and monitor drinking water supplies to ensure safe and good-tasting water. But what happens once the water has been piped to towns, neighborhoods, and homes? Older homes may still have service lines made of lead going into the home, which can result in unacceptable levels of lead leaching into the water. The local water supply system should be able to confirm the presence of lead service lines for homeowners. Older fixtures that contain lead, or lead that was used to solder pipe joints, can also cause elevated lead levels. Whenever possible, pipes and fixtures containing lead should be replaced with new materials.

Homes built before the 1960s often have galvanized steel pipes. While galvanized pipes do not create chemical contaminants on their own, they are susceptible to severe corrosion which can flake off and clog taps and faucets. In some instances lead can build up inside galvanized pipes, especially if the service line into the home is or was made of lead. To be on the safe side, it is best to have all galvanized piping replaced.

Another possible water quality concern is what are known as emerging contaminants, which, if present in a home, usually occur in very low level amounts. These fall into two general categories: health effects and aesthetic effects. Emerging contaminants affecting health include detergents, pesticides, and medications. Other contaminants that don't affect health may adversely alter water taste, odor, and/or color. Homeowners can have their water tested, or do it themselves with readily available water-testing kits, in order to detect any such contaminants. Home filtration systems are the most common means of reducing emerging contaminants. Options include faucet or pitcher filters, plumbed, or reverse-osmosis filters that treat the entire home's water supply. Any filtration system considered should be listed as meeting national standards for reducing multiple contaminants.

Well Water Quality
While most people in North America get their water from community water systems, there are still millions who rely on well water at home. Water from a well should be tested on a regular basis. If well water coming from the tap tests high for lead, it could be that the water in the well is too acidic, which causes lead to leach from pipes and fixtures. An acid neutralizing system can usually alleviate this problem without the need to replace pipes and fixtures. Other possible well water quality problems can be avoided by making sure wells are located away from septic tanks, livestock, and pooling water runoff. Well maintenance should not be overlooked, so that any issues can be addressed before they cause big headaches for homeowners.

--courtesy of Pillar to Post Home Inspectors

Luc Poirier

Luc Poirier

Broker
CENTURY 21 Shield Realty Ltd., Brokerage*
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