How to Sell Your House For the Most Money In the Shortest Possible Time

How to Sell Your House For the Most Money

In the Shortest Possible Time

Your imagination is the most powerful tool you have to improve the value of your property – and it’s free.  Here’s how:  Step out of your own shoes and step into your potential buyer’s shoes.  Then take a good, realistic look at your house and property, and consider:  Is it appealing?  Can you imagine yourself living there comfortably?  Or do you imagine yourself putting in a lot of work to make the house and property acceptable?

Most buyers are interested in three things about a property they’re considering:

  1. Visual appeal (landscaping, spaciousness, cleanliness, color, lack of clutter)
  2. Maintenance (everything in working order, nothing to repair or paint)
  3. Safety (locks and deadbolts, burglar/fire alarm systems, busyness of the neighborhood)

 If a potential buyer can’t form a good mental picture of living in your house no sale!  With this in mind, you’ll want to give your property a good, hard look from the outside in.  You want to create a fabulous first impression so everyone will want to come inside.

What to Look For On the Outside

      Roof and gutters:  When buyers look at your house from their car, about 30 percent of what they see is your roof.  Be certain it’s in good repair.

      Landscaping:  A well-manicured yard and a smooth, even driveway reassure potential buyers that you care about your property.

      Paint and siding:  Neutral colors and a clean appearance are important.  In season, consider repainting or staining wood siding and power-washing vinyl siding.

      Porch or covered patio:  Make sure it’s clean and uncluttered. In season, consider power-washing and re-staining if required.

      Fence:  Fencing should be in good repair.

What to Look For On the Inside

      Kitchen:  Regardless of your kitchen size, you can make it feel spacious:  Remove appliances and gadgets from your counter tops and store them.  Repair damaged or cracked counters.

      Bathrooms:  Replace faucets, medicine cabinet, and towel racks if necessary; be certain the bathrooms are spotless and fresh-smelling.

      Master Bedroom:  Spaciousness and décor are important.  Remove and store nonessential furniture. Make sure unused clothing is removed to create a feeling of spaciousness.

      Flooring:  An investment in new flooring if the present covering is worn or damaged almost always increases the perceived value of a home.  

      Wall covering:  A fresh coat of paint can do wonders, especially if it's needed.  Speak with a professional at your paint supplier regarding colors. Always use a washable eggshell latex.

      Personal touches:  Avoid personal touches which may distract potential buyers.

Deciding What to Do First

            The most important thing to think about first is this:  Fix what you can see!  Cosmetic changes, regardless of the cost, will make a world of difference when it comes time to sell.  Whatever you saw when you put on your potential buyer’s shoes, that’s what you do first, from the outside in.

            Keep in mind that you want the best return on your investment.  When you make cosmetic changes, you maximize popular appeal.  People will see what looks great, and they’ll picture themselves living there.  Conversely if your home looks untended, people will imagine how much work they have to do – again, no sale!


Earning the right to be your Realtor® Consultant for life,


Stephen J. Hall NLAR                                                                                                                                                        Realtor®Consultant                                                                                                                                                             Century 21 Sellers Choice Inc.                                                                                                                                               (709) 682-2502 cell                                                                                                                                                                  (709) 834-2300                                                                                                                              (e-fax                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          e-mail


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