Is HST Applicable On Ontario Assignment Sales?

This is a Great Article When purchasing or Flipping an Assigment....

  

 Inevitably, an offer to purchase an assignment property (often on an OREA form 140 or 141) by a buyer's sales representative will state that, if applicable, HST is included in the purchase price (as we typically see in any offer to buy resale residential properties). The sales representative who represents a seller of an assignment (and who is advising the seller) MUST be aware that according to the Canada Revenue Agency, there are sometimes situations where HST will, in fact, be applicable and payable by the assignor/seller who is assigning a contract to buy a newly constructed unit/residence.

When applicable, HST will be payable by the Assignor (buyer #1 from the builder) on the portion of the assignment sale price related to the return of deposits (paid to the builder by the assignor/seller) PLUS the gross profit (the difference between the builder price and the assignment price).

The confusing question is whether or not HST is, in fact, applicable to the assignment and, since realtors should not undertake the responsibility to advise a seller on such a matter, MAKE SURE (as a listing sales rep advising a seller/assignor) THAT AN ASSIGNMENT SALE WHICH STATES HST IS INCLUDED IN THE PRICE IS CONDITIONAL ON ASSIGNOR'S/SELLER'S LAWYER'S APPROVAL so that the lawyer for the assignor/seller will be responsible to advise a seller whether or not HST is applicable to the assignment/sale. The idea is to shift the burden of responsibility from the shoulders of the listing sales representative to the shoulders of the lawyer for the assignor/seller.

Believe it or not, whether or not HST is applicable to an assignment depends on the original intention/the plan (in the mind of the assignor/seller) when the offer to purchase was made with the builder. If the PRIMARY PURPOSE by the assignor/seller in buying from the builder was to profit by assigning/flipping the deal, THEN HST IS APPLICABLE to the assignment/sale.

On the other hand, if an individual originally signed an offer to purchase a condo apartment (to be newly constructed by a builder) with the primary intention that the unit bought would be used (for example) by:

(1) a son or daughter when attending University/College, OR
(2) a parent who wanted or needed a place to reside, or
(3) a spouse who planned to separate from the family, or
(4) the buyer(s) who intended to downsize, or
(5) the buyer(s) who intended to use the apartment when working downtown or when visiting Toronto
(6) a son or daughter who was engaged to be married, or
(7) buyer wanted to move closer to a workplace OR to relocate a place of work

THEN the Canada Revenue Agency would typically conclude that HST is not applicable on the assignment/sale if (at a later date) a reasonable change in circumstance resulted in an assignment/sale of the unit if, for example,

(1) such son/daughter chose not to go to University/College, or
(2) the buyer's mom or dad no longer could use or wanted to use such apartment as a residence
(due to their death or needs a retirement home), or
(3) intention to separate from family changed, or
(4) decision was made later not to downsize, or
(5) the buyer(s) reasonably changed his/their minds about such intended use, or
(6) the engaged son or daughter decided not to marry or decided to live elsewhere, or
(7) the workplace location changed or the intended relocation of workplace changed

The question is whether the facts or circumstances would indicate to the Canada Revenue Agency that the condo was originally being acquired from the builder for the primary purpose of personal use versus buying the unit for only a potential profit with the intention of assigning or flipping the deal. If a buyer purchases two or more new condo units or has a corporation purchase a residential unit, it is more difficult (perhaps impossible) to try to explain to the Canada Revenue Agency that the primary purpose in buying from the builder was to acquire the unit for personal use as a residence for an immediate family member.

The bottom line is that a listing realtor, seeing an offer from an assignee, should encourage the assignor/seller to sign back the offer with a condition for approval of the terms of the sale by the lawyer for the assignor/seller.

If you have any questions about assignments, please call me.

We have 8 Toronto area law offices to serve you! See our current 8 locations at www.home-legal-cost.com.

Be aware that anyone can print out legal fees AND legal disbursements by clicking on QUOTATION on our website provided the purchase or sale price is under $1.5 million.

Regards,

STEPHEN SHUB

Stephen H. Shub Professional Corporation
Barrister, Solicitor, Notary

8 Toronto Area Law Offices with
34 staff serving you in many languages
www.home-legal-cost.com
Cell 416-520-6120
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Shayzaad Kassam

Shayzaad Kassam

Broker
CENTURY 21 Millennium Inc., Brokerage*
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