Seniors must correct an iron deficiency

Seniors must correct an iron deficiency

(NC)—Iron deficiency affects a large population of women in their child bearing years globally, generally due to menstruation. But after the change of life, for both men and women, iron deficiency is also a big problem.

Seniors generally require 10 mg/day of iron. However, 15 to 30 per cent of those over 70, both men and women, are iron deficient. Iron deficiency in seniors is linked with poor health, fatigue, depression and increased dependence on others.

Symptoms of iron deficiency in seniors include decreased cognitive function, dizziness, and apathy. Other symptoms of iron deficiency may include decreased ability to concentrate, increased frequency of infection, paleness, dark circles under the eyes, brittle hair and nails, shortness of breath, restless legs, and cold hands and feet.

Iron deficiency is the first step towards anemia, and anemia is a big problem in seniors. Up to 44 per cent of seniors are anemic, which increases after age 65 and sharply rises after 85.

“Pick up on the iron deficiency before anaemia develops, and it is safer to treat and easier to correct,” says Dr. Cathy Carlson-Rink, a licensed naturopathic physician and registered midwife. “A serum ferritin test is the best way to identify iron deficiency.”

A healthy diet coupled with the use of a high-quality iron deficiency prevention product will help symptoms to diminish. Iron-rich foods include leafy green vegetables, such as spinach, kale, or even seaweed, as well as raisins, prunes, apricots, lean meats and eggs.

More information can be found online at www.requiredforlife.com or toll-free at 1-888-436-6697.

www.newscanada.com

Stephen Hall

Stephen Hall

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CENTURY 21 Seller's Choice Inc.
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